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Late Winter 2019: Artisan

Late Winter 2019: Artisan

Historically, the word “artisan” has been reserved for craftspeople dedicated to a high level of quality and artfulness in their work. Over the last decade, however, the term has become so ubiquitous and ill-defined that it has lost almost all meaning. The craze for all things artisan has led to corporations attempting to pass off mass-produced products as craft goods by using “artisanal” in their branding, from Starbucks breakfast sandwiches to Tostitos chips to Weight Watchers frozen pizza. This issue of edible is an attempt to rein in the use of the word before it loses relevance altogether. In these pages, we celebrate an assortment of true artisans—talented, local craftspeople who, through their specialized knowledge, hard work, and artistry, help shape the soul of our food culture.

Taste of Clay

Micaceous Pots of Northern New Mexico By Marjory SweetFelipe Ortega micaceous pot. Photo by Douglas Merriam. It’s just after 6pm but it feels like midnight in La Madera. It is completely dark outside, except for the stars and a few strings of holiday lights. It is dim...

Foraged: Canaigre

Dessert from the Desert Story and Photos by Ellen Zachos I first saw canaigre at Chaco Canyon, but since the Park Service frowns on foraging in national historical parks, I refrained from harvesting. Fortunately, it didn’t take long to find more of this...

Chorizo and Grits Bowl

Chorizo and Grits Brunch BowlServes 42 1/2 cups water1 cup milk1 teaspoon salt (more to taste)1/2 teaspoon paprika1 teaspoon red chile powder1 cup of quick grits (not instant)1 15-ounce can of black beans,      rinsed and drained1 cup sharp cheddar cheese,...

Handmade Pottery and the Locavore Movement

By Jen DePaolo Pottery from various Gathered pop-up dinners. Photos courtesy of Gathered.I’m on a mission to build my life around my place. As the locavore movement has led many of us to ask where our food comes from and how it was grown, my work over the...

Historically, the word “artisan” has been reserved for craftspeople dedicated to a high level of quality and artfulness in their work. Over the last decade, however, the term has become so ubiquitous and ill-defined that it has lost almost all meaning. The craze for all things artisan has led to corporations attempting to pass off mass-produced products as craft goods by using “artisanal” in their branding, from Starbucks breakfast sandwiches to Tostitos chips to Weight Watchers frozen pizza. This issue of edible is an attempt to rein in the use of the word before it loses relevance altogether. In these pages, we celebrate an assortment of true artisans—talented, local craftspeople who, through their specialized knowledge, hard work, and artistry, help shape the soul of our food culture.   

To truly appreciate artisanal food we must first understand the time, thought, and skill that goes into creating it. We visit a local chef who shows us that making a superior tortilla means taking no shortcuts. At a butchery workshop, we learn how utilizing every part of an animal is both more ethical and more delectable. And we discover how chefs in Albuquerque and Santa Fe are redefining the art and flavor of vegan and gluten-free baking, one beautiful pastry at a time.   

The ideals of slow food do not stop at food. When we consider the benefits of slow food, we often consider how using local ingredients helps support a local land-based ethic, helps promote a strong and vibrant local economy and community, and helps enrich our lives with unique, and at times sublime, levels of quality in our meals. Yet perhaps less often do we consider the apparatuses around our food. As the stories in this issue make clear, ordinary kitchenware, ranging from the pots and knives we cook with to the plates we eat from and even the washcloths we clean with, can all similarly add value to our meals, communities, and landscape.

We hope these stories demonstrate that the artisan economy in our state is robust, diverse, and plays an integral part in creating our local food culture and sense of place.

Taste of Clay

Taste of Clay

Micaceous Pots of Northern New Mexico By Marjory SweetFelipe Ortega micaceous pot. Photo by Douglas Merriam. It’s just after 6pm but it feels like midnight in La Madera. It is completely dark outside, except for the stars and a few strings of...

Foraged: Canaigre

Foraged: Canaigre

Dessert from the Desert Story and Photos by Ellen Zachos I first saw canaigre at Chaco Canyon, but since the Park Service frowns on foraging in national historical parks, I refrained from harvesting. Fortunately, it didn’t take long to...

Chorizo and Grits Bowl

Chorizo and Grits Bowl

Chorizo and Grits Brunch BowlServes 42 1/2 cups water1 cup milk1 teaspoon salt (more to taste)1/2 teaspoon paprika1 teaspoon red chile powder1 cup of quick grits (not instant)1 15-ounce can of black beans,      rinsed and drained1 cup...

Handmade Pottery and  the Locavore Movement

Handmade Pottery and the Locavore Movement

By Jen DePaolo Pottery from various Gathered pop-up dinners. Photos courtesy of Gathered.I’m on a mission to build my life around my place. As the locavore movement has led many of us to ask where our food comes from and how it was...

Sweet Potato Falafel Bowl

Sweet Potato Falafel Bowl

Sweet Potato Falafel BowlMakes 12 falafel1 medium sweet potato, roasted and skin removed1 15-ounce can unsalted chickpeas, rinsed1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper1/2 cup fresh parsley, chopped1 clove garlic, minced1 tablespoon ground cumin2...

Making Their Mark, with Love

Making Their Mark, with Love

International District Workshop Creates Opportunities and Textile ProductsBy Nora Hickey · Photos by Stacey M. Adams Liberata Norora from the Democratic Republic of Congo printing dish towels at Kei & Molly Textiles.You may have...

Tahini Kale Salad

Tahini Kale Salad

Tahini Kale SaladServes 48 large kale leaves, stemmed and cut into small pieces1 lemon, juiced1 tablespoon olive oil1/4 teaspoon sea saltTahini Dressing4 tablespoons tahini2 garlic cloves, minced1 lemon, juiced2 tablespoons pure maple...

Asian Bison Bowl

Asian Bison Bowl

Asian Bison Bowl Serves 41 pound ground bisonFreshly ground black pepper to taste5 cloves garlic, minced1 tablespoon sesame oil1 tablespoon fresh ginger, grated1/4 cup light brown sugar1/2 cup low-sodium soy sauce combined with 1/2 cup...

A Los Lunas Café with  a Foreign Accent

A Los Lunas Café with a Foreign Accent

Europa Coffee.Tea.Bakery Mixes Farm-raised Fare with Finds from AbroadBy Joanna Manganaro Toto · Photos by Stephanie Cameron Left: House-made savory quiche. Right: Soup of the day.Thomas Dollahite, proprietor of Los Lunas’ Peculiar...

The New Mores of “Less”

The New Mores of “Less”

How Two Local Plant-based, Gluten-free Producers Are Reimagining the Art of the TreatStory and Photos by Gabriella Marks Left: Planty Sweet cheesecake. Right: Karina Cake of Planty Sweet decorating one of her textured asymmetrical...

+ other stories

Edible celebrates New Mexico's food culture, season by season. We believe that knowing where our food comes from is a powerful thing. With our high-quality, aesthetically pleasing and informative publication, we inspire readers to support and celebrate the growers, producers, chefs, beverage and food artisans, and other food professionals in our community.

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