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Late Summer: Borderlands

Late Summer: Borderlands

“To those who would legislate and erect walls and borders, our tracks and paths are long here, and they will remain,” declares Denise Chávez in these pages. “Footsteps twenty-three thousand years old have been found and documented at nearby White Sands, New Mexico, and so the migratory travelers through El Paso del Norte will continue to seek their homeland.”

The borderlands we inhabit are not demarcated neatly by lines on maps. They have long been a place of movement, a place of mixing, a place of deep roots. They are a homeplace and a center, and central to this homeplace is food. This issue of edible offers  a small testament to the ways food roots us, even as it crosses, as it always has, unlegislatable terrain.

We follow the tracks of the recovering Gould’s turkey across our state’s bootheel and northern Chihuahua; we learn how to make bitter liqueurs at a gathering near the headwaters of the Rio Grande, across our state’s northern border; and we explore a promising food hub linking farmers with markets throughout southwestern New Mexico. We talk blue corn bourbon and agave spirits with a Las Cruces distiller and visit a seafood restaurant in Juárez whose chef and bartender have toured eastern Europe playing heavy metal. Not least, guided by Chávez and her ties to the region, we trace the stories behind El Paso’s famed Elemi.

Whatever your position in relation to the borderlands, we hope these stories deepen your thinking on the tapestry of footsteps and foodways that connect us.

“To those who would legislate and erect walls and borders, our tracks and paths are long here, and they will remain,” declares Denise Chávez in these pages. “Footsteps twenty-three thousand years old have been found and documented at nearby White Sands, New Mexico, and so the migratory travelers through El Paso del Norte will continue to seek their homeland.”

The borderlands we inhabit are not demarcated neatly by lines on maps. They have long been a place of movement, a place of mixing, a place of deep roots. They are a homeplace and a center, and central to this homeplace is food. This issue of edible offers  a small testament to the ways food roots us, even as it crosses, as it always has, unlegislatable terrain.

We follow the tracks of the recovering Gould’s turkey across our state’s bootheel and northern Chihuahua; we learn how to make bitter liqueurs at a gathering near the headwaters of the Rio Grande, across our state’s northern border; and we explore a promising food hub linking farmers with markets throughout southwestern New Mexico. We talk blue corn bourbon and agave spirits with a Las Cruces distiller and visit a seafood restaurant in Juárez whose chef and bartender have toured eastern Europe playing heavy metal. Not least, guided by Chávez and her ties to the region, we trace the stories behind El Paso’s famed Elemi.

Whatever your position in relation to the borderlands, we hope these stories deepen your thinking on the tapestry of footsteps and foodways that connect us.

On the Road  to Recovery: Gould’s Turkey

On the Road to Recovery: Gould’s Turkey

In “On the Road to Recovery: Gould’s Turkey,” Katie DeLorenzo tells the story of how these native wild turkeys have reestablished a healthy population in New Mexico after being on the state threatened species list for almost four decades.

Harvesting Hornworms

Harvesting Hornworms

In this edition of Touch and Grow, Marisa Thompson shares strategies for identifying these ubiquitous nightshade pests (hornworms) and giving them a more suitable environment to munch in.

Remembering The  Chicharrones

Remembering The Chicharrones

In “Remembering the Chicharrones,” celebrated Las Cruces author Denise Chávez explores the history and inspiration behind the cuisine at Elemi restaurant in El Paso.

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