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Late Summer 2021: Travel

Late Summer 2021: Travel

The heat is on, and with it, travel. In this travel issue, our first in two years, we take to the road. Grateful to once again be able to ramble and roam, we relish the flavors of our greater region, from El Paso to Fort Collins, Chama to Magdalena. Photographer (and edible publisher) Stephanie Cameron assembles a montage of the historic and up-and-coming flavors of El Paso, while Nora Hickey provides a sampling of the history of sour beers that might tempt a visit to Fort Collins—or just tempt you to branch out the next time you sit down at the bustling patio at a local brewery. 

This issue of edible meets you at the height of summer. Still healing from a difficult year, we celebrate the bounty of the season’s harvests with a sense of gratitude for those who have sustained our food community, working on our local farms, in our grocery stores, and in our restaurants. In this spirit, we move forward with hope for the possibilities, appearing like the welcome sight of a monsoon cloud on the horizon, of a reopening state.

Sun City: An @TravelNewMexico Photo Essay

In “A Gastronomic Tour of El Paso,” publisher Stephanie Cameron set off with Amy Tischler
and Caitlin Jenkins, founders of @TravelNewMexico, to discover what has become one of our new favorite destinations. With suggestions from several locals, we got the lowdown on where we should eat, imbibe, shop, and stay.

When in Drought

Gardening Practices to Save Water and Beat the Heat By Marisa ThompsonPrickly pear cactus. ...

Jambo Cafe

Local Hero: Best Restaurant, Santa Fe An Interview with Ahmed Obo, Founder and Chef-Owner Photos...

Travel

The heat is on, and with it, travel. In what feels like a flash, time has shifted from a crawl to warp speed. Traffic is thick. Airports are busy. Markets buzz and hop. Renewal, rejuvenation, and post-traumatic growth pervade conversations in the kitchen and at the table, and here at edible we are feeling the thrill of possibility, too. An exciting element of that potential is discovering what may be a stone’s throw from home but has remained untouched, untasted, out of view.

In this travel issue, our first in two years, we take to the road. Grateful to once again be able to ramble and roam, we relish the flavors of our greater region, from El Paso to Fort Collins, Chama to Magdalena. Photographer (and edible publisher) Stephanie Cameron assembles a montage of the historic and up-and-coming flavors of El Paso, while Nora Hickey provides a sampling of the history of sour beers that might tempt a visit to Fort Collins—or just tempt you to branch out the next time you sit down at the bustling patio at a local brewery.

The drought that has persisted for the past two decades seeps into these pages as well. After a year even drier than those before, some local farmers have been advised not to plant, and water managers predict that, by the time you read this, some of our state’s irrigation ditches, the lifeblood of our communities and local food system, will have gone dry. With this slow-moving but deepening crisis in mind, state horticulturist Marisa Thompson offers tips for adjusting our home and garden landscapes for drier times; Ellen Zachos shares recipes for a well-adapted dryland native, sumac; and Michael Dax, in his journey up the Chama to explore the food and drink options closest to its headwaters, can’t help but muse on the shrinking reservoir and browning landscape he passes along the way.

This issue of edible meets you at the height of summer. Still healing from a difficult year, we celebrate the bounty of the season’s harvests with a sense of gratitude for those who have sustained our food community, working on our local farms, in our grocery stores, and in our restaurants. In this spirit, we move forward with hope for the possibilities, appearing like the welcome sight of a monsoon cloud on the horizon, of a reopening state.

Sun City: An @TravelNewMexico Photo Essay

Sun City: An @TravelNewMexico Photo Essay

In “A Gastronomic Tour of El Paso,” publisher Stephanie Cameron set off with Amy Tischler
and Caitlin Jenkins, founders of @TravelNewMexico, to discover what has become one of our new favorite destinations. With suggestions from several locals, we got the lowdown on where we should eat, imbibe, shop, and stay.

When in Drought

When in Drought

Gardening Practices to Save Water and Beat the Heat By Marisa ThompsonPrickly pear cactus.  Calling all plant fanatics, gardeners of all skill levels, rosarians, arborists, and shrub lovers: If you are responsible for watering even a single plant, this exercise is for...

Jambo Cafe

Jambo Cafe

Local Hero: Best Restaurant, Santa Fe An Interview with Ahmed Obo, Founder and Chef-Owner Photos by Douglas Merriam  Originally from Lamu Island, one of a chain of seven islands off the coast of Kenya, Ahmed M. Obo came to the United States in 1995, worked in...

MUSHROOM AND PEPPER FAJITAS

MUSHROOM AND PEPPER FAJITAS

This recipe is a great way to showcase colorful bell peppers, and mushrooms are a meaty vegetarian substitute for the skirt steak used in traditional Tex-Mex fajitas. Because there is no meat to be grilled, this recipe is easy to throw into the oven for a quick...

Guide to Ice Cream Around the State of New Mexico

Guide to Ice Cream Around the State of New Mexico

We have your sweet tooth covered, whether you love ice cream, custard, gelato, or sorbet. In our Guide to Ice Cream Around the State, we focus on hand-crafted and homemade ice cream with creative twists on flavors, many of which take inspiration from ingredients easily sourced in New Mexico.

Tomatillo and Melon Sorbet

Tomatillo and Melon Sorbet

This recipe does require an ice-cream maker, which we think is well worth the investment. But if you don’t have one, you can use this same recipe to make a granita. Because the sugar content of your fruit can vary, you will want to perform the egg test* to ensure the...

Sour, Savory Sumac

Sour, Savory Sumac

New Mexico has several native species of edible sumac. Rhus trilobata (a.k.a three-leaf sumac) is native to most of the state and is a popular landscape plant, valued even more for its exceptional red fall foliage than for its tasty fruit. R. glabra (a.k.a. smooth sumac) is native to about half of New Mexico’s counties, and is also found as a feral and cultivated shrub throughout the state. R. lanceolata (a.k.a. prairie sumac) is native to Doña Ana and Eddy Counties, and the rare R. virens (a.k.a. evergreen sumac), is native to a few southern counties. All of these species produce edible, tart fruit.

New Home, Sweet Home

New Home, Sweet Home

In the small village of Magdalena, owners Michal Gola and Osiris Navarro have integrated with the community as they have rejuvenated the diner. Transplants from Seattle with international roots, they have crafted their menu with feedback from the locals, and, in the process, have created a local gathering place that has offered connection in isolation times.

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Edible New Mexico
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About The Author

Edible New Mexico

Edible celebrates New Mexico's food culture, season by season. We believe that knowing where our food comes from is a powerful thing. With our high-quality, aesthetically pleasing and informative publication, we inspire readers to support and celebrate the growers, producers, chefs, beverage and food artisans, and other food professionals in our community.

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