This recipe does require an ice-cream maker, which we think is well worth the investment. But if you don’t have one, you can use this same recipe to make a granita. Because the sugar content of your fruit can vary, you will want to perform the egg test* to ensure the proper sweetness and creaminess of your sorbet.

NOTE: *Take an uncooked egg in the shell, wash very well with soap and water, dry it, then place the egg in the sorbet base after you’ve strained it. A portion of the egg, about the diameter of a quarter, should be visible on the surface of the liquid. If the egg sinks to the bottom, the mixture needs more sugar to reach the correct concentration for optimal texture. If the egg totally floats on top, add more citrus juice or fruit purée/juice to thin the liquid a bit. (We got the egg test from the Bread & Basil blog: breadandbasil.nyc/recipes/sorbet-guide.)

 

Tomatillo and Melon Sorbet

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups honeydew melon cut into small cubes
  • 2 1/2 cups tomatillos husks removed and chopped
  • 1 cup sugar divided
  • Zest of one lime
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 egg for egg test*

Instructions

  • Depending on the type of ice-cream maker you have, place bowl in the freezer 24 hours before preparing the sorbet.
  • In a blender or food processor, blend melon, tomatillos, and 2/3 cup of sugar until smooth. Add lime zest while mixing. Strain purée through a fine-mesh strainer, extracting as much liquid as possible. Straining ensures a smooth sorbet. Perform the egg test*, and add remaining sugar, if needed, to reach desired consistency and sweetness.
  • Stir in lime juice and salt, and taste. Add more of each as needed. The sorbet will taste less sweet when frozen; salt and lime juice help enhance the fruit’s flavor.
  • Chill the mixture thoroughly for at least 2 hours, but preferably overnight, before churning in an ice-cream maker. Base should be 40°F before churning. Churn according to ice-cream maker’s instructions.
  • Transfer sorbet to an airtight container and freeze for at least 2 hours before serving.

Notes

*Take an uncooked egg in the shell, wash very well with soap and water, dry it, then place the egg in the sorbet base after you’ve strained it. A portion of the egg, about the diameter of a quarter, should be visible on the surface of the liquid. If the egg sinks to the bottom, the mixture needs more sugar to reach the correct concentration for optimal texture. If the egg totally floats on top, add more citrus juice or fruit purée/juice to thin the liquid a bit.
(We got the egg test from the Bread & Basil blog: breadandbasil.nyc/recipes/sorbet-guide.)

 

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