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Spring 2018: Highways and Byways

Spring 2018: Highways and Byways

This issue we travel along trade routes, old and new, to explore refashioned historic treasures and under-appreciated new ones. We stop along the old Santa Fe Trail, where new businesses have invested in Las Vegas, and the Turquoise Trail, where old mining towns have reinvented themselves as artist havens and day-trip destinations. We take respite along I-40, beside the historic 66, and discover that a handful of truckstop restaurants are offering some of the best Indian food for hundreds of miles in any direction.

Two Natives in a Garden

Indian Pueblo Cultural Center's Resilience Garden By Mike Barthelemy Left: Resilience Garden at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center. Right: Bettina Sandoval. Photos courtesy of IPCC. “Sheez, you Pueblos are kinda too darn much,” I joked with Bettina Sandoval...

Milad’s Traditional and Experimental Persian Cuisine

By Katherine Mast · Photos by Douglas Merriam Left: Vegetarian plate with dolmas, beet falafel, lebna with pistachio-olive tapenade, and hummus. Right: Stuffed trout with walnuts, barberries, garlic, tarragon, onions, and dill...

Food Fighters

Carlos Condit and Israel Rivera on their Rough-and-Tumble Paths into Albuquerque’s Food Scene By Candolin Cook · Photos by Stephanie Cameron Left to right: Israel Rivera and Carlos Condit at The Shop eating green chile cheeseburgers and drinking nitro...

Best beverage artisan, spirits, Little Toad Creek

An edible Local Hero is an exceptional individual or organization working to create innovative, vibrant, and resilient local food systems in New Mexico. Last fall, edible readers nominated and voted for their favorite food artisans, growers, and advocates...

Nettle Soup

How to Avoid the Sting and Enjoy the Green by Ellen Zachos Nettle Soup The deep, rich green of nettle soup seems almost too vibrant to be natural. Its flavor is full and wild. Olive oil 1/2 cup chopped onion 1/2 cup thinly sliced Jerusalem artichokes (you...

Nettles in New Mexico

How to Avoid the Sting and Enjoy the Green by Ellen Zachos Finding Nettles I have a knack for finding stinging nettles the hard way. The first time, I was strolling through a grassy field with sandals on, and felt a sharp sting on my...

Behind the Bottle: Chef’s Talk Wine

MÁS Tapas y Vino and DH Lescombes Recipe by Marc Quiñones · Photos by Stephanie Cameron This year, edible takes you behind the bottle with chefs from around the state who are creating inspired pairings with New Mexico wines. Each chef creates a dish...

Cherry Elk Tenderloin

Recipe by Marc Quiñones · Photos by Stephanie Cameron Crispy Heirloom Carrots | Boursin Potato Purée | Cracked Black Pepper Parsley Salad | St. Clair Lescombes Petite Sirah Demi-Glace Serves 2 2 center cut elk tenderloins, 7–8 ounces each 1 cup fresh dark...

Rose Hip Cordial

Makes about 2 quarts This cordial can be made with wild rose hips, fresh or dried. 1 pound fresh rose hips, or 1/2 pound dried 3 cups granulated white sugar 6 cups water If using dried rose hips, soak in the 6 cups water overnight. Boil them in their rose...

Spring Thyme

Recipe by Quinn Stephenson, owner and mixologist of Coyote Cafe Coyote Cafe mixologist and owner, Quinn Stephenson, shakes up this bright cocktail just in time for spring. 2 ounces citrus vodka 4 ounces Granny Smith apple juice (see recipe below) 1/2...

For several years now, as the first sprouts break through the thawing soil, edible has taken to the wheel to explore some of the region’s lesser-known culinary corners. The open road can mean different things for many people: freedom and possibility, long commutes or long hauls of freight. Whether the road is a means to get away, or a means to get ahead, the food along the way is often no mere afterthought, but a vital part of the trip. This issue we travel along trade routes, old and new, to explore refashioned historic treasures and under-appreciated new ones. We stop along the old Santa Fe Trail, where new businesses have invested in Las Vegas, and the Turquoise Trail, where old mining towns have reinvented themselves as artist havens and day-trip destinations.

We take respite along I-40, beside the historic 66, and discover that a handful of truckstop restaurants are offering some of the best Indian food for hundreds of miles in any direction. We also investigate the Taos Ski Valley, where classic European elegance mixes with modern menus. And going off the beaten path pays off in the remote Cañon de la Madera, where a small farm plays host to some of the most creative cuisine in the state.

As always, we encourage you to traverse our scenic state and stop frequently along the way. We invite you to explore the back roads and also to re-examine the options along some of our busiest asphalt. Those highways and byways take us out of our comfort zones and away from our everyday fare, allowing us to broaden our physical and culinary horizons. New Mexico’s foodscapes are as diverse as our landscapes, and for those with adventurous spirits and palates, the open road beckons.

Two Natives in a Garden

Indian Pueblo Cultural Center's Resilience Garden By Mike Barthelemy Left: Resilience Garden at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center. Right: Bettina Sandoval. Photos courtesy of IPCC. “Sheez, you Pueblos are kinda too darn much,” I joked with Bettina Sandoval...

Milad’s Traditional and Experimental Persian Cuisine

By Katherine Mast · Photos by Douglas Merriam Left: Vegetarian plate with dolmas, beet falafel, lebna with pistachio-olive tapenade, and hummus. Right: Stuffed trout with walnuts, barberries, garlic, tarragon, onions, and dill...

Food Fighters

Carlos Condit and Israel Rivera on their Rough-and-Tumble Paths into Albuquerque’s Food Scene By Candolin Cook · Photos by Stephanie Cameron Left to right: Israel Rivera and Carlos Condit at The Shop eating green chile cheeseburgers and drinking nitro...

Best beverage artisan, spirits, Little Toad Creek

An edible Local Hero is an exceptional individual or organization working to create innovative, vibrant, and resilient local food systems in New Mexico. Last fall, edible readers nominated and voted for their favorite food artisans, growers, and advocates...

Nettle Soup

How to Avoid the Sting and Enjoy the Green by Ellen Zachos Nettle Soup The deep, rich green of nettle soup seems almost too vibrant to be natural. Its flavor is full and wild. Olive oil 1/2 cup chopped onion 1/2 cup thinly sliced Jerusalem artichokes (you...

Nettles in New Mexico

How to Avoid the Sting and Enjoy the Green by Ellen Zachos Finding Nettles I have a knack for finding stinging nettles the hard way. The first time, I was strolling through a grassy field with sandals on, and felt a sharp sting on my...

Behind the Bottle: Chef’s Talk Wine

MÁS Tapas y Vino and DH Lescombes Recipe by Marc Quiñones · Photos by Stephanie Cameron This year, edible takes you behind the bottle with chefs from around the state who are creating inspired pairings with New Mexico wines. Each chef creates a dish...

Cherry Elk Tenderloin

Recipe by Marc Quiñones · Photos by Stephanie Cameron Crispy Heirloom Carrots | Boursin Potato Purée | Cracked Black Pepper Parsley Salad | St. Clair Lescombes Petite Sirah Demi-Glace Serves 2 2 center cut elk tenderloins, 7–8 ounces each 1 cup fresh dark...

Rose Hip Cordial

Makes about 2 quarts This cordial can be made with wild rose hips, fresh or dried. 1 pound fresh rose hips, or 1/2 pound dried 3 cups granulated white sugar 6 cups water If using dried rose hips, soak in the 6 cups water overnight. Boil them in their rose...

Spring Thyme

Recipe by Quinn Stephenson, owner and mixologist of Coyote Cafe Coyote Cafe mixologist and owner, Quinn Stephenson, shakes up this bright cocktail just in time for spring. 2 ounces citrus vodka 4 ounces Granny Smith apple juice (see recipe below) 1/2...

Edible Santa Fe

Edible Santa Fe

Edible celebrates New Mexico's food culture, season by season. We believe that knowing where our food comes from is a powerful thing. With our high-quality, aesthetically pleasing and informative publication, we inspire readers to support and celebrate the growers, producers, chefs, beverage and food artisans, and other food professionals in our community.
Edible Santa Fe

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About The Author

Edible Santa Fe

Edible celebrates New Mexico's food culture, season by season. We believe that knowing where our food comes from is a powerful thing. With our high-quality, aesthetically pleasing and informative publication, we inspire readers to support and celebrate the growers, producers, chefs, beverage and food artisans, and other food professionals in our community.

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