saladCherries are here!!  Danielle from Beet Happening had some gorgeous sweet cherries at the farmers’ market last week – you just have to get there early enough to buy some. This salad, adapted from Bon Appetit’s recent issue, is absolutely fabulous. The combination of spring radishes and early summer cherries captures the essence of June, this wonderful in-between time. And Vida Verde farm is growing the fantastic Little Gem lettuce this year, which looks like tiny Romaine, but has the texture of butter lettuce. This is great with leftover roast chicken, but for a vegetarian option I’d try toasted pecans. The croutons are deliciously decadent – frying them in duck or chicken fat makes them ultra-crunchy, but olive oil works fine too.

 

1 pound sweet cherries

2 cooked chicken thighs

1/2 pound lettuce (preferably Little Gem or butter lettuce)

4 radishes, sliced

1 T. chopped chives

3 T. duck or chicken fat, butter or olive oil

1 C. cubed dry bread

Salt and freshly ground pepper

2 T. Sherry vinegar

3 T. Dijon mustard

1 t. honey

1 garlic clove, minced

1/4 C. olive oil

 

Pit cherries by squeezing them over a bowl to catch the juice. Slice meat from chicken thighs, reserving any skin. Wash lettuce, dry thoroughly, and tear into bite-size pieces. Arrange cherries, chicken, radishes and chives over the lettuce on four plates. Melt fat in a skillet on medium heat. Add bread and chicken skin and toss to coat. Fry, turning frequently, until the bread cubes are golden, about 2 minutes. Drain on paper towels and season with salt and pepper while still hot. Whisk vinegar, mustard, honey, garlic and olive oil together and season with salt and pepper. Drizzle dressing (and any remaining cherry juice) over salad and garnish with croutons and chicken skin. Serves 4.

Blogger Amy White is totally obsessed with vegetables and  fruits. Amy can be found every Friday right here, and on her blog, www.veggieobsession.com.

Stephanie Cameron

Stephanie Cameron

Edible celebrates New Mexico's food culture, season by season. We believe that knowing where our food comes from is a powerful thing. With our high-quality, aesthetically pleasing and informative publication, we inspire readers to support and celebrate the growers, producers, chefs, beverage and food artisans, and other food professionals in our community.
Stephanie Cameron

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