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Early Winter 2018: Roots

Early Winter 2018: Roots

The stories in this issue explore how some of our deepest culinary traditions continue to influence our food and offer important ways to envision our future. We take a look at several efforts to highlight, preserve, and reimagine Native cuisines in our state (and beyond). Chef Lois Ellen Frank educates us on her style of “new Native” cuisine, blending ancient techniques and flavors with evolving recipes. We also visit the farmers at Red Willow Farm at Taos Pueblo, who are investing in the future by growing traditional crops and training the next generation of Native food producers. Chef Myles Lucero tells us how the stories of his favorite ingredients inspire his recipes. And we look at artist and permaculturist Roxanne Swentzell’s efforts to revitalize traditions and promote nutrition in tribal communities, while encouraging everyone to tap into their local and ancestral food roots.

A Future for Blue Corn

Can the New Mexico Landrace Corn Project Facilitate an Agricultural Revival?By Michael Dax · Photos by Stephanie Cameron When Joseph Jaramillo retired from a twenty-six-year career at the Southwest Indian Polytechnic Institute, he returned to the land that...

Seed Stories

Saving the Roots of Native TruthBy Briana Olson · Photos by Douglas Merriam When I leave sculptor, seed saver, and permaculturist Roxanne Swentzell's home in Santa Clara Pueblo, my hands are so full that it's hard to open the car door. I'm trying to eat...

Eating Back to the Future

Exploring Contemporary Native American Cuisine with Chef Lois Ellen FrankBy Gabriella Marks Red Mesa Cuisine offers a culinary experience where guests and participants are educated on the history of the foods they eat and how these Native American foods...

Tarragon and Mint Ice Cream

Makes 2 pints1 large bunch fresh tarragon—mostly leaves1 large bunch fresh mint—mostly leaves2 cups whole milk1 cup heavy cream5 large egg yolks3/4 cup granulated sugarBruise tarragon and mint with the back of a chef’s knife to help release their oils....

Back to Basics

Myles Lucero Tells His Story By Michael Dax · Photos by Sergio Salvador Chef Myles Lucero of Prairie Star at the Santa Ana Pueblo.“What drove me to move spaces,” Myles Lucero says, “is [that] I’ve come to a point where I want to give back to some people...

In the last issue of edible, we explored some of the more recent migrations of plants, people, and flavors that have shaped our state’s cuisine. For this issue, we take a look at our roots. We celebrate our state’s long agricultural history, our uniquely adapted crops and wild plants, and the deeply entrenched food traditions that contribute to New Mexico’s essential culinary identity.

The stories in this issue explore how some of our deepest culinary traditions continue to influence our food and offer important ways to envision our future. We take a look at several efforts to highlight, preserve, and reimagine Native cuisines in our state (and beyond). Chef Lois Ellen Frank educates us on her style of “new Native” cuisine, blending ancient techniques and flavors with evolving recipes. We also visit the farmers at Red Willow Farm at Taos Pueblo, who are investing in the future by growing traditional crops and training the next generation of Native food producers. Chef Myles Lucero tells us how the stories of his favorite ingredients inspire his recipes. And we look at artist and permaculturist Roxanne Swentzell’s efforts to revitalize traditions and promote nutrition in tribal communities, while encouraging everyone to tap into their local and ancestral food roots.

We also go to Old Town in Albuquerque and learn how new flavors are re-energizing the food scene for locals. We visit a ranch in Santa Fe that uses cooking and the cowboy spirit to help our veterans, and we examine efforts by the New Mexico Landrace Corn Project to preserve a crop with some of the deepest roots in our region, New Mexico landrace blue corn. Finally, we learn about the history of a well-established fruit tree in our state, the apricot.

Through these stories, we are reminded that just as a tree’s roots, though underground and unseen, provide the stability and nourishment for long-term health and abundant harvests, so too does a community rely on its roots for the development of a healthy, local, place-based cuisine. In important but sometimes hard-to-see ways, our state’s deep agricultural and culinary roots continually feed and support the growing and ever-changing local food movement in New Mexico.

Pear, Bourbon, Thyme,  and Brie Clafoutis

Pear, Bourbon, Thyme, and Brie Clafoutis

Serves 8 - 104 medium pears1/3 cup heavy cream1/2 cup whole milk3 tablespoons bourbon3 eggs8 ounces of soft brie (we like Old Windmill Dairy)4 tablespoons flour1 tablespoon honey1 tablespoon of fresh thyme leaves plus 2 teaspoons for garnishSalt and pepper...

Cowboy Up!

Cowboy Up!

Veterans find a place at the table By Candolin Cook · Photos by Stephanie Cameron“We believe the creator gave us the horse as a gift of transcendence bridging the spiritual world with physical world,” says Rick Iannucci. Shortly after dawn on a crisp October morning,...

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Edible New Mexico

Edible celebrates New Mexico's food culture, season by season. We believe that knowing where our food comes from is a powerful thing. With our high-quality, aesthetically pleasing and informative publication, we inspire readers to support and celebrate the growers, producers, chefs, beverage and food artisans, and other food professionals in our community.

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