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Author: Edible Santa Fe

COOKING FRESH FALL 2009

fall soupsBy Kate Manchester After reading Anna Thomas’ Love Soup (p 32), I began to think of all the soups I can look forward to making this fall. I belong to a CSA, and it was challenging trying to use all the food in our weekly box this summer, because of the heat, soup was not on my radar. I did manage to blanch and freeze the copious amounts of kale we got, and zucchini went into everything– breads, omelets, fritters, and casseroles. Salad greens were easy to eat, as were the precious figs, peaches and early apples. Soon enough I’m looking forward to turning our weekly box into soup that will feed us generously for dinner and several lunches, with enough left over to freeze. Most of the soups here are made from veggies you’ll find in abundance at local farmers markets during the fall, and of course – you’ll need good stock for all of them. Roasting the veggies is always an option, and I recommend it if you have time – you can use the same recipes, but roasting the vegetables prior to using them for soup will give you an entirely different result. Fall veggies still have a good bit of moisture, roasting them will take the moisture but leave you a concentrated sweetness that will lend a rich, earthy depth to your soups. I...

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COOKING FRESH – Fall soups

fall soupsBy Kate Manchester After reading Anna Thomas’ Love Soup (p 32), I began to think of all the soups I can look forward to making this fall. I belong to a CSA, and it was challenging trying to use all the food in our weekly box this summer, because of the heat, soup was not on my radar. I did manage to blanch and freeze the copious amounts of kale we got, and zucchini went into everything– breads, omelets, fritters, and casseroles. Salad greens were easy to eat, as were the precious figs, peaches and early apples. Soon enough I’m looking forward to turning our weekly box into soup that will feed us generously for dinner and several lunches, with enough left over to freeze. Most of the soups here are made from veggies you’ll find in abundance at local farmers markets during the fall, and of course – you’ll need good stock for all of them. Roasting the veggies is always an option, and I recommend it if you have time – you can use the same recipes, but roasting the vegetables prior to using them for soup will give you an entirely different result. Fall veggies still have a good bit of moisture, roasting them will take the moisture but leave you a concentrated sweetness that will lend a rich, earthy depth to your soups. I...

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edible southwest nation

Farming Chimayó Chile: Cultivating Faithstory and photos by Gigi Ragland Two types of pilgrims travel along the winding and scenic “High Road” into the picturesque Chimayó. Both are in search of the divine. They seek what one might call a “religious experience,” however the motivation driving each traveler’s pilgrimage is quite different, a sacred versus secular calling leading to the charming Chimayo. For over a century, pious believers trekked to El Santuario de Chimayo seeking holy healing and mercy from health problems. Their journey ended when they reached the original “morada,” (family house of worship) where, since its founding in the early 1800s, pilgrims have lightly tread with fervor across the Santuario’s “El Posito” (sacred sand pit)dirt floor believing it was a conduit of God’s divine powers. Touching the dirt, grazing their fingertips across the fine soil, was a sacred, and, hopefully, curative act for these pilgrims in search of healing. It has been called the “Lourdes of America.” Today, one can still see visitors at El Santuario making their way to the “El Posito,” and, with perhaps a few pious pilgrims in their midst. The other type of pilgrim is motivated by an entirely different calling. Getting to the historic shrine is not their mission, but it’s close enough to their goal, close by way of proximity and connection with the soil. Small fields of the legendary Chimayo...

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Piri Piri

From Chicken on the Grill, Wm. Morrow Cookbooks A Portuguese slice of heaven, piri piri is sublimely spicy chicken. The name derives from the fiery African dried red chile traditionally used in the piquant sauce that bathes the bird. Every Portuguese family has its own “secret” ingredient, such as the whiskey included here. 4 bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts and 4 bone-in, skin-on leg-thigh sectionsCoarse salt, either kosher or sea salt Piri-Piri Sauce¾ C. olive oil3 T. fresh lemon juice2 T. Scotch or Irish whiskey2 to 3 T. dried hot red chile flakes2 plump garlic cloves, crushed into a purée Season the chicken parts generously with salt, rubbing some of it under the skins, being careful to avoid tearing the skin. Let the chicken sit at room temperature for about 20 minutes. Stir together the sauce ingredients in a small bowl. Fire up the grill, bringing the heat to medium (4 to 5 seconds with the hand test). Transfer the chicken to the grill skin-side down. Grill the chicken uncovered over medium heat for 30 to 35 minutes, turning at least four times. Watch for flare-ups, shifting the breasts away from the flames if necessary. After you have turned the chicken for the first time, begin to brush it liberally with the sauce, but avoid dripping much on the fire to minimize flare-ups. End with the chicken skin-side down to...

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High Plains Buffalo Steak

From Born to Grill, Harvard Common Press Grilled Tomato Vinaigrette 1 pound small tomatoes, preferably Italianplum½ C. olive oil2 T. red wine vinegar2 t. molasses1 plump garlic clove1 t. ground cumin1 t. kosher salt or other coarse salt½ t. freshly ground black pepperFour 8- to 10-ounce strip, rib-eye or sirloinbuffalo steaks, about 1 in. thickKosher salt or other coarse saltFreshly ground black pepper Fire up the grill for a two-level fire capable of cooking first on high heat (1 to 2 seconds with the hand test) and then on medium heat (4 to 5 seconds with the hand test). Salt and pepper the buffalo steaks, cover them and let them sit at room temperature for 20 to 30 minutes. Grill the tomatoes uncovered over high heat, turning occasionally until they are soft with brown, splitting skins and some black spots, about 10 to 12 minutes. If grilling covered, cook for about 8 to 10 minutes, turning once midway. In a blender, combine the whole tomatoes— skins, cores and all—with the remaining vinaigrette ingredients. Purée,adjust the seasoning if necessary and reserve the warm vinaigrette. Grill the steaks uncovered over high heat for 2 to 2½ minutes per side. Move the steaks to medium heat, turning them again, and continue grilling for 2 to 2½ minutes per side for medium-rare doneness, when the lean meat tastes the best. The steaks should...

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