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Author: Edible Santa Fe

Carrot Soup

When I walk through the market in the fall and early winter – there seems to be an abundance of carrots right through early winter. Add a cooked potato or two to this, or even some roasted or steamed cauliflower. I like to puree it but keep it pretty chunky. 1 ¼ lb. carrots1 T. extra-virgin olive oil2 medium cloves garlic, minced1 large yellow onion or one fat leek, chopped3 C. or more of vegetable or chicken stockjuice of 1/2 a lemonsalt to taste Optional Toppings: Crème fraiche, sour cream, or Greek yogurt, spicy garlic oil, chili oil or toasted sesame oil to drizzle, toasted pine nuts, chopped scallions, crispy fried shallots, chopped chives… Clean your carrots, and cut them into 1-inch chunks and set aside. Heat the olive oil in a large, heavy soup pot over medium heat. Add garlic and onions and sauté until the onions are translucent. Add the stock and carrots and bring to a simmer. Simmer for 20 to 30 minutes, or until the carrots are just tender. Let soup cool for a few minutes. Puree with a hand blender or in a blender, then stir in the lemon juice, and then salt to taste. The salt is the key here, salt is a flavor enhancer and you want the flavor to be bright, so add a pinch and taste, add a pinch and...

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Squash and Apple Soup

2 T. unsalted butter2 T. olive oil4 C. chopped yellow onions (2-3 large onions)2 T. mild curry powder2 large butternut squash6 apples2 t. salt1/2 t. freshly ground black pepper3-4 C. chicken or vegetable stock2 C. fresh apple cider2 T. toasted pecans, coarsely choppedCrème fraiche2 T. chopped apple Heat the butter, olive oil, onions, and curry powder in a large stockpot over low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Stir occasionally, scraping the bottom of the pot. Cut the squash in half, remove the seeds, and peel. Cut the squash into chunks. Peel and halve the apples, scoop out the core, and cut into chunks. Bring two cups of stock to a boil in a large stockpot. Add the squash, apples, salt, and pepper. Bring to a boil, cover, and cook over low heat for 30 to 40 minutes, until the squash and apples are very soft. Turn off the heat and cool the soup, then process coarsely in a blender or food processor. Pour the soup back into the pot, and add the cider and a little more stock, the soup should be a little sweet and thick, so add the remaining stock accordingly. Reheat the soup, and add salt and pepper to taste. Pour soup into bowls and top with a dollop of crème fraiche, a teaspoon of chopped apple, and a teaspoon...

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Garlic Soup

My sister doesn’t really care for cooking, but she does like good food. This is one of her favorite soups, which she often whips up on a weeknight and pairs with a toasted sandwich of some sort. You can roast the garlic the night before and refrigerate – which means you can have this soup ready in less than a half hour.

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COOKING FRESH FALL 2009

fall soupsBy Kate Manchester After reading Anna Thomas’ Love Soup (p 32), I began to think of all the soups I can look forward to making this fall. I belong to a CSA, and it was challenging trying to use all the food in our weekly box this summer, because of the heat, soup was not on my radar. I did manage to blanch and freeze the copious amounts of kale we got, and zucchini went into everything– breads, omelets, fritters, and casseroles. Salad greens were easy to eat, as were the precious figs, peaches and early apples. Soon enough I’m looking forward to turning our weekly box into soup that will feed us generously for dinner and several lunches, with enough left over to freeze. Most of the soups here are made from veggies you’ll find in abundance at local farmers markets during the fall, and of course – you’ll need good stock for all of them. Roasting the veggies is always an option, and I recommend it if you have time – you can use the same recipes, but roasting the vegetables prior to using them for soup will give you an entirely different result. Fall veggies still have a good bit of moisture, roasting them will take the moisture but leave you a concentrated sweetness that will lend a rich, earthy depth to your soups. I...

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COOKING FRESH – Fall soups

fall soupsBy Kate Manchester After reading Anna Thomas’ Love Soup (p 32), I began to think of all the soups I can look forward to making this fall. I belong to a CSA, and it was challenging trying to use all the food in our weekly box this summer, because of the heat, soup was not on my radar. I did manage to blanch and freeze the copious amounts of kale we got, and zucchini went into everything– breads, omelets, fritters, and casseroles. Salad greens were easy to eat, as were the precious figs, peaches and early apples. Soon enough I’m looking forward to turning our weekly box into soup that will feed us generously for dinner and several lunches, with enough left over to freeze. Most of the soups here are made from veggies you’ll find in abundance at local farmers markets during the fall, and of course – you’ll need good stock for all of them. Roasting the veggies is always an option, and I recommend it if you have time – you can use the same recipes, but roasting the vegetables prior to using them for soup will give you an entirely different result. Fall veggies still have a good bit of moisture, roasting them will take the moisture but leave you a concentrated sweetness that will lend a rich, earthy depth to your soups. I...

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