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Author: Edible Santa Fe

Cultivating Companions

  Planting Edible Partners By Christie Green Symbiosis. Mutual and multiple benefits. How can each of our actions and choices be beneficial in as many ways as possible? These questions inform and shape my approach to any garden, landscape, ecological conundrum and challenge. Yes, beauty, but also benefit. And so with growing edibles, there is the ultimate goal of delicious fare for the dinner table; but how can the actual growing and cultivation techniques be optimized to provide the healthiest food and most harmonious growing conditions that give back to the ground, returning valuable nutrients to the soil as...

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From Good Earth: Salt of the Earth and Sweet Off the Vine

From Good Earth Salt of the Earth and Sweet off the Vine By Randy Shamlia Imagine if you will, a sunny day in 1598 when Don Juan de Oñate and a band of Spanish Colonists traversed The Royal Road (El Camino Real) along the Rio Grande in search of a new settlement. Even then it was semi-parched land, and the Franciscan Monks would soon follow in de Onate’s footsteps. Wine, the representational “Blood of Christ” was consumed as part of the ceremonial Sacrament then, as it is today. The Monks inevitably needed a supply of wine and waiting months to be refortified from the Old World would not suffice. So, in 1629 Frays Garcia de Zuniga, a Franciscan, and Antonio de Arteaga, a Capuchin Monk, planted the first vitis vinifera variety in the Rio Grande Valley of Southern New Mexico. Known appropriately as the Mission grape, the vines were brought back by missionaries from Spain. Although Spanish Colonists were prohibited by law to export plantings, religious devotion took precedence in the New World. Thus, the Monks spurred what would become a prolific wine industry in New Mexico. {loadposition articleads} Centuries later, only yards from The Royal Road in the northern part of Albuquerque, is a plot of land owned by Erich and Pat von Schuetze, who have toiled away producing a variety of wine grapes for over three decades....

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What’s Fresh, What’s Local Spring 2009

What’s Fresh, What’s Local Shop your local farmers market this spring! Asparagus Arugula Beets Chard Chives Collards Cucumbers Fava Beans Garlic Garlic Scapes Herbs Galore Jerusalem Artichokes Kale Lettuce Peas Radishes Salad Greens Snap Peas Snow Peas Sorrel Spinach Spring Onions Sprouts Apricots Jujubes Rhubarb Eggs—chicken, duck, turkey Chicken Grass Fed Beef Lamb Buffalo Goat Meat Yak Goat Milk Goat...

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Whats Fresh

What’s Fresh, What’s Local Shop your local farmers market this spring! Asparagus Arugula Beets Chard Chives Collards Cucumbers Fava Beans Garlic Garlic Scapes Herbs Galore Jerusalem Artichokes Kale Lettuce Peas Radishes Salad Greens Snap Peas Snow Peas Sorrel Spinach Spring Onions Sprouts Apricots Jujubes Rhubarb Eggs—chicken, duck, turkey Chicken Grass Fed Beef Lamb Buffalo Goat Meat Yak Goat Milk Goat...

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Cooking Fresh: Spring Ahead

COOKING FRESH Spring Ahead By Jenny George This season I’m inspired by a book I’m reading—the lush, recipe-filled memoir of the great, late Southern cook Edna Lewis, who tells the story of seasonal cooking on her family’s farm. She describes a typical spring dinner menu: braised forequarter of mutton, thin-sliced skillet-fried white potatoes, skillet wild asparagus, salad of tender beet tops and lamb’s quarters garnished with chervil, yeast rolls with butter and apricot preserves, butter cookies, rhubarb pie, coffee, and—if neighbors stop by—dandelion wine. Wow! This was hearty spring dining, meant for hardworking people. With menus like that one lingering in my mind, I’ve put together a collection of dishes (featuring our local, spring products, of course) to feed you during these months. Spring is about growth and transformation, about planting and organizing and cleaning out the old stuff…and that’s hard work. So feast; feast on freshness and newness and the best the season can serve up. Minted Jerusalem Artichoke Salad Jerusalem artichokes aren’t really artichokes; they are a tasty tuber related to the sunflower. Raw and sliced thin, they are crisp and mild, slightly nutty and slightly sweet. They pair beautifully with mint. This salad comes from Patricia Wells’ Vegetable Harvest. 1 t. freshly squeezed lime juice ½ t. fine sea salt ¼ C. extra virgin olive oil 40 fresh mint leaves, cut into chiffonade 1 pound Jerusalem...

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