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Author: Edible Santa Fe

What’s Fresh, What’s Local Spring 2009

What’s Fresh, What’s Local Shop your local farmers market this spring! Asparagus Arugula Beets Chard Chives Collards Cucumbers Fava Beans Garlic Garlic Scapes Herbs Galore Jerusalem Artichokes Kale Lettuce Peas Radishes Salad Greens Snap Peas Snow Peas Sorrel Spinach Spring Onions Sprouts Apricots Jujubes Rhubarb Eggs—chicken, duck, turkey Chicken Grass Fed Beef Lamb Buffalo Goat Meat Yak Goat Milk Goat...

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Whats Fresh

What’s Fresh, What’s Local Shop your local farmers market this spring! Asparagus Arugula Beets Chard Chives Collards Cucumbers Fava Beans Garlic Garlic Scapes Herbs Galore Jerusalem Artichokes Kale Lettuce Peas Radishes Salad Greens Snap Peas Snow Peas Sorrel Spinach Spring Onions Sprouts Apricots Jujubes Rhubarb Eggs—chicken, duck, turkey Chicken Grass Fed Beef Lamb Buffalo Goat Meat Yak Goat Milk Goat...

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Hoe and Skillet: Accidental Vegetarian

HOE AND SKILLET Accidental Vegetarian Adam Mackie Twenty-five years ago I stopped eating meat. There was no moral tussle. I was paying the price of dietary indiscretion in an exotic locale: Anything other than plain rice and boiled water resulted in a spectacular relapse. Weeks passed, and I delicately introduced more challenging fare. Broth, boiled carrots, bread, some fruit; at least I would not get scurvy. The weeks became months. I dreamed of meat. Grilled lamb chops, to be precise (I was in Wales). Tasty, scrunchy, juicy, chewy, greasy, all in one bite, nothing compares, right? I planned carefully: two chops for Saturday lunch, and if I suffered, Sunday to recover. I walked down to the village shops and into the butcher’s, white tiles, sawdust on the floor and pink and white sides of lamb swinging from racks behind the counter. The butcher had his back to me, busy with a cleaver. I paused on the threshold, took in the sights and smells of his trade, then turned on my heel, never to return. I had lost the conditioning that allows us to eat meat, conditioning necessary for so many things we learn to enjoy when we leave our mothers’ breasts. We are not born with a taste for coffee, green vegetables, pickled herring, red chile or meat. {loadposition articleads} Mahatma Gandhi advised us “Keep your habits positive because...

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Cooking Fresh

COOKING FRESH Spring Ahead By Jenny George This season I’m inspired by a book I’m reading—the lush, recipe-filled memoir of the great, late Southern cook Edna Lewis, who tells the story of seasonal cooking on her family’s farm. She describes a typical spring dinner menu: braised forequarter of mutton, thin-sliced skillet-fried white potatoes, skillet wild asparagus, salad of tender beet tops and lamb’s quarters garnished with chervil, yeast rolls with butter and apricot preserves, butter cookies, rhubarb pie, coffee, and—if neighbors stop by—dandelion wine. Wow! This was hearty spring dining, meant for hardworking people. With menus like that one lingering in my mind, I’ve put together a collection of dishes (featuring our local, spring products, of course) to feed you during these months. Spring is about growth and transformation, about planting and organizing and cleaning out the old stuff…and that’s hard work. So feast; feast on freshness and newness and the best the season can serve up. Minted Jerusalem Artichoke Salad Jerusalem artichokes aren’t really artichokes; they are a tasty tuber related to the sunflower. Raw and sliced thin, they are crisp and mild, slightly nutty and slightly sweet. They pair beautifully with mint. This salad comes from Patricia Wells’ Vegetable Harvest. 1 t. freshly squeezed lime juice ½ t. fine sea salt ¼ C. extra virgin olive oil 40 fresh mint leaves, cut into chiffonade 1 pound Jerusalem...

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Cooking Fresh: Spring Ahead

COOKING FRESH Spring Ahead By Jenny George This season I’m inspired by a book I’m reading—the lush, recipe-filled memoir of the great, late Southern cook Edna Lewis, who tells the story of seasonal cooking on her family’s farm. She describes a typical spring dinner menu: braised forequarter of mutton, thin-sliced skillet-fried white potatoes, skillet wild asparagus, salad of tender beet tops and lamb’s quarters garnished with chervil, yeast rolls with butter and apricot preserves, butter cookies, rhubarb pie, coffee, and—if neighbors stop by—dandelion wine. Wow! This was hearty spring dining, meant for hardworking people. With menus like that one lingering in my mind, I’ve put together a collection of dishes (featuring our local, spring products, of course) to feed you during these months. Spring is about growth and transformation, about planting and organizing and cleaning out the old stuff…and that’s hard work. So feast; feast on freshness and newness and the best the season can serve up. Minted Jerusalem Artichoke Salad Jerusalem artichokes aren’t really artichokes; they are a tasty tuber related to the sunflower. Raw and sliced thin, they are crisp and mild, slightly nutty and slightly sweet. They pair beautifully with mint. This salad comes from Patricia Wells’ Vegetable Harvest. 1 t. freshly squeezed lime juice ½ t. fine sea salt ¼ C. extra virgin olive oil 40 fresh mint leaves, cut into chiffonade 1 pound Jerusalem...

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